Brewery plan given go-ahead

Transport secretary Patrick McCloughlin, Erewash MP Jessica Lee and Cllr Simon Spencer deputy leader Derbyshire county council and cabinet leader highways and transport looking at trainline through Ilkeston.

Transport secretary Patrick McCloughlin, Erewash MP Jessica Lee and Cllr Simon Spencer deputy leader Derbyshire county council and cabinet leader highways and transport looking at trainline through Ilkeston.

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Kimberley is getting 22 fresh homes amid hopes they can revive a historic part of the town.

The Hardy Close scheme was approved by Broxtowe councillors who were told they would be on the fringes of a conservation area.

They will face oast buildings which formed part of the former Hardy’s and Hanson’s Brewery. The location also includes offices and maltings, which form part of a building on a list of the UK’s most historic or important structures.

Since the brewery closed, there have been concerns over the future of the site, which has legal protection.

The new homes scheme was unanimously backed by Broxtowe Development Control Committee on Wednesday.

Cllr David Watts, who chaired the meeting, said: “I am absolutely delighted this has come forward.

“I hope it will give momentum to get the rest of the brewery site developed. It would be absolutely wonderful,” he told members.

Cllr Andy Cooper also supported the housing project, saying there had been some good amendments to the original proposals.

Cllr Lydia Ball added:”I must say I was impressed with this plan. I hope the people who live in Kimberley think the same thing.”

She said it was important to keep a stone wall around the site, pointing out that these are a feature of the town.

One detached Victorian house will be demolished to allow the scheme to go ahead on the site, which is largely an open field. Four trees have legal protection and cannot be felled.

And one side of the site is close to Kimberley’s old railway cutting, which is now listed as a “site of special scientific interest” because of its unusual plants and wildlife.

A council report to the committee said:”Surrounding buildings include a simple form of Victorian architecture with former brewery buildings opposite exhibiting a level of unfussy industrial architecture.

“It is important that the buildings include a level of simplicity which allows them to be read as background buildings which do not compete with the grander architecture of the entrance to the brewery office buildings.

“But this must be balanced with the need to incorporate detail and quality of materials which complement buildings in the immediate vicinity which contribute to making the conservation area a special and distinctive place.”

The report describes the new homes as “three short rows of terraced housing which provide a simple block.”

It adds that they “work well in an area where buildings are set in long unbroken frontages providing a strong sense of canyon-like quality when passing through Hardy Street.”