Brinsley schoolkids celebrate opening of hi-tech Headstocks tour

Brinsley Primary school children celebrating a very interesting project at Brinsley Headstocks, Georgia Richards 9, Leigh Hames 8 and twins Hollie and Ellie Bis 7 show off their QR-code interactive tour.
Brinsley Primary school children celebrating a very interesting project at Brinsley Headstocks, Georgia Richards 9, Leigh Hames 8 and twins Hollie and Ellie Bis 7 show off their QR-code interactive tour.

A class of schoolkids has been honoured with a launch event for families for their ingenious history project at Brinsley Headstocks.

Year 3/4W at Brinsley Primary School launched their project at Brinsley Headstocks on Tuesday, March 24, where they learnt about the wood by developing a video which they filmed themselves, a leaflet, and a treasure hunt which uses QR codes, so you can learn about the Headstocks by snapping pictures with your smartphone and receiving snippetsw of historical information and facts about nature.

Teacher James Wainwright of the Moor Road School said: “Their work will make the Headstocks an interactive venue for families to visit as well as help to preserve this heritage for future generations.

The classes of 34 children unveiled the project to parents, Broxtowe Mayor Stan Heptinstall, Broxtowe Groundworks and Friends of Brinsley Head Stocks on Tueday.

Mr Wainwright added: “The children have all been fantastic on the project and worked really hard - we’ve had some very accomplished artwork for the project and the Friends of Brinsley Headstocks have been very accommodating by providing all the local history.

Mayor of Broxtowe Stan Heptinstall said: “The children from Brinsley Primary School do a lot in the outdoors. Some time ago they planted some spring bulbs in the Headstocks and we got to see those sprouting. They’ve also planted a hedge. I went up to congratulate them on what they had done, and when I was given the leaflet they’d done, I was bowled over.

“The QR code really got me - I didn’t even know what it was, so they showed me how to use it and I could see all the kids talking about the area in their YoutTube video, and the barcode hunt was brilliant - I tried number seven, which tells you about a house in the distance which was owned by DH Lawrence’s uncl. Others identify all the trees and history of where you’re standing.

“It’s astounding that these young children know about this budding technology that I’ve never even heard of.

“It was so nice, such a lovely occasions.”

Tracy Lloyd of Groundwork Greater Nottingham worked alongside the class on the project She said: “It’s all about enlivening children’s interests in the local area. You could see how much they got out of it and they really enjoyed showing it to their parents.

“They leanrt a great deal – they are now som kids of the few people in the counrty who can identify trees by their winter twigs.”

Brinsley headstocks was in service for 98 years , closing in 1934. The Eastwood area is believed to have been a mining centre for seven centuries.