‘Garden grabbing’ fears spark petition

NRHNLM110815C1 - Residents of langley mill are unhappy about garden grabbing. from left Lynn Bright, Patricia Ottowell, Paul Winfield, Dawn Winfield and June Barlow

NRHNLM110815C1 - Residents of langley mill are unhappy about garden grabbing. from left Lynn Bright, Patricia Ottowell, Paul Winfield, Dawn Winfield and June Barlow

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A PETITION against a home planned for a Langley Mill back garden has been started by a concerned resident.

Lynn Bright fears that the new home planned for Cromford Road may be the start of a ‘garden grabbing’ trend.

She is worried that developers will snap up other properties for sale in the road so they can sell off the gardens for a quick profit.

She says it could result in another row of houses appearing in between Cromford Road and Dalton’s Close in years to come

Planning permission has already been granted to build a home on a nearby back garden and she wants to get plans for the latest scheme halted before it is too late.

Mrs Bright, 60, who lives next door to the development, is calling on her neighbours to object to the planning application which is due to be decided by September 19.

She said: “People need to be aware of this because on the notice from the planning board it just says it is going to be a semi-detached house on Cromford Road – nowhere does it mention that it is to be built in a back garden.

“This week we have been putting posters in peoples’ windows and we have been up and down the street with a petition.

“The fear is that this will be the start of a new row of houses between us and Dalton’s Close. Every available gap is being built on.”

Mrs Bright says she now has more than 60 names on a petition to stop the building work.

The office worker, who was recently widowed, also said 13 people had written objection letters to Amber Valley Borough Council.

The latest plan by applicant Mohammad Setayesh is for a four-bedroom detached house on the garden, with room for loft space and vehicular access.

Mr Setayesh is behind both garden developments on the road. His first application, to build a home in his own back garden, was approved last year.

This week he was unavailable for comment.

In the design and access statement submitted with the latest plan, it says that the ‘character’ of the proposed building is in keeping with the rest of the street and would make use of a currently ‘unused’ patch of land, which sits on a neighbour’s property.

It is the second time the application has been submitted – an earlier proposal was withdrawn in June after Mrs Bright complained that the new building would be too close to the boundaries of her house. It has since been re-submitted with amendments.

In June 2010, changes were made to national planning policies, which are supposed to have made it harder to get planning permission for building homes in back gardens by no longer classing them alongside ‘previously developed land’ such as old factories.