More needs to be done to prevent Notts suicides

Chad Pride Awards.      
P.C. Nicola Bland is present with her Emergency Services award by Coun. Joyce Bosnjak on behalf of The Peaceful Uhuru Trust who sponsored the award.
Chad Pride Awards. P.C. Nicola Bland is present with her Emergency Services award by Coun. Joyce Bosnjak on behalf of The Peaceful Uhuru Trust who sponsored the award.

More needs to be done to address the county’s ‘unacceptable’ suicide rate, according to a health chief.

More than 60 people die from suicide in Nottinghamshire every year – and men aged between 35 – 64 accounts for 75% per cent of suicides. Many suicides are preventable through the provision of early support to those at risk.

Councillor Joyce Bosnjak, chairman of the Health and Wellbeing Board at Nottinghamshire County Council, said: “Nottinghamshire’s current suicide rate is “unacceptable” and much more can and should be done to prevent suicide.

“Identifying those at risk and making the right intervention can be very challenging. The county council recognises the need to train frontline workers who may come across those at risk of suicide and in turn can provide early interventions.”

Mental health and suicide prevention training programmes have been commissioned by Nottinghamshire County Council with providers delivering ASIST – Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training, which enables professionals to become more willing, ready and able to help people who are at risk of suicide.

Cllr Bosnjak added: “The support of friends and relatives is crucial for people who may be at risk of suicide and for people who have lost someone to suicide. However, it is not always enough.

“Often more formal help is needed from skilled councillors, GPs or mental health services.

“Suicide prevention is everyone’s business and we want to encourage people to develop skills in supporting people who may be at risk.”