Report shows police forces are ‘making progress’ in tackling corruption

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A report launched today by Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC), has recognised the progress put in place by police forces to prevent and tackle corruption.

The report, ‘Integrity Matters’, sets out HMIC’s findings on the capability of police forces in England and Wales to tackle misconduct.

No evidence was found to suggest that corruption is endemic within the police service in its inspections.

Nottinghamshire Police has been mentioned for its work to train supervisors about how they are expected to lead their teams on integrity, trust and honesty. The ‘Shaping conversations’ course, involves training on ethical and professional behaviour provided to first-line supervisors and managers, focusing on leadership and includes training on unconscious bias and recognising and responding to ethical dilemmas in policing.

HMI Mike Cunningham said: “When we spoke to police officers and staff it was clear that chief officer teams are demonstrating their commitment to addressing misconduct and corruption. Police officers were also quick to tell us that they see corrupt colleagues as a betrayal of the vast majority who are honourable, decent and hard-working. Police forces have made great strides in tackling misconduct and corruption and now they need to continue that work to focus on proactive, prevention work.”

A bi-monthly police standards and integrity board chaired by the deputy chief constable was also acknowledged in the report, as well as governance meetings, held by the police and crime commissioner that are open to the public to monitor and manage ethical and integrity issues.

Det Supt Jackie Alexander, head of the Professional Standards Directorate, said: “While we are proud and have confidence in the quality of public service offered by the vast majority of our officers and staff in Nottinghamshire Police, we have taken a very proactive stance at looking into integrity and corruption in this force, and remain committed to uncovering and dealing appropriately with the small number of those who fall below the high standards of professional behaviour policing demands.”

“I am pleased that some of the work that we have undertaken has been recognised in this report but we are continually looking to progress this area, and we will never be complacent. We will continue to build on good, proactive work and conduct effective investigations where we suspect, or if a member of the public reports concerns about, the behaviour of our officers or staff.”

The full HMIC report ‘Integrity Matters’ can be downloaded from: www.justiceinspectorates.gov.uk/hmic/wp-content/uploads/police-integrity-and-corruption-2015.pdf