REVEALED: Millions of pounds made from parking charges and fines in Nottinghamshire

Stock picture.
Stock picture.

Newly-released figures show the amount of money Nottinghamshire councils generated from parking charges and fines in the last year. The RAC Foundation said 353 local councils in England made a surplus of £756m in 2015-16 - nine per cent higher than in 2014-15. Here’s how much money Nottinghamshire councils generated, from highest to lowest...

Nottingham City Council 

2015-16: £13,556,000

2014-15: £13,271,000

2013-14: £12,064,000

2012-13: £11,791,000

2011-12: £3,251,000

Newark and Sherwood District Council

2015-16: £807,000

2014-15: £807,000

2013-14: £658,000

2012-13: £557,000

2011-12: £730,000

Bassetlaw District Council

2015-16: £436,000

2014-15: £403,000

2013-14: £362,000

2012-13: £233,000

2011-12: £220,000

Nottinghamshire County Council

2015-16: £221,000

2014-15: £392,000

2013-14: £24,000

2012-13: £-307,000

2011-12: £12,000

Rushcliffe Borough Council

2015-16: £342,000

2014-15: £299,000

2013-14: £282,000

2012-13: £242,000

2011-12: £261,000

Ashfield District Council

2015-16: £68,000

2014-15: £79,000

2013-14: £98,000

2012-13: £-17,000

2011-12: £-35,000

Broxtowe District Council

2015-16: £14,000

2014-15: £-36,000

2013-14: £-77,000

2012-13: £-83,000

2011-12: £-139,000

Mansfield District Council

2015-16: £-146,000

2014-15: £301,000

2013-14: £352,000

2012-13: £280,000

2011-12: £595,000

Gedling Borough Council

2015-16: £-86,000

2014-15: £-153,000

2013-14: £-155,000

2012-13: £-206,000

2011-12: £-241,000

RAC Foundation director Steve Gooding said: “These numbers might seem eye-wateringly large - but in part they reflect the growing competition for space in many of our towns and cities.

“In 1995 there were only 21.4 million cars on Britain’s roads, today there are 30.7 million.

“Parking charges are one of the tools councils use to keep traffic moving while also allowing people reasonable and affordable access to shops and facilities.

“The good news is any profit generated by councils from on-street parking must, by law, be spent on transport-related activities and, as every motorist knows, there’s no shortage of work that needs doing.”

The figures are calculated by taking income from charges and penalties, then deducting the costs of the service.

The LGA, which represents councils across England and Wales, said local authorities must ‘strike a balance’ when setting charges to ensure there were parking spaces available and traffic was not held up.