Three secondary schools in Eastwood, Kimberley and Selston exclude 1,300 times

Eastwood Comprehensive School.

Eastwood Comprehensive School.

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More than 1,300 exclusions from secondary schools in Kimberley, Eastwood and Selston have taken place over the last five years, with almost 500 from one school.

The Kimberley School has seen 479 permanent and fixed exclusions in the last five years - the highest number out of the three local secondary schools.

In fact, the number of exclusions at the school on Newdigate Street was almost 100 more than that of nearby school Hall Park Academy (formerly Eastwood Comprehensive School).

Chris Teal, headteacher at The Kimberley School said they monitored exclusions very carefully, they always send home a letter detailing the standard of behaviour they expect from pupils when they are given a fixed term exclusion and they have not had any permanent exclusions so far this academic year.

He added: “We try very hard to avoid permanent exclusions at all costs, but if the individual gives us little choice then we do it for the benefit of the school community.

“I’m not sure whether we have a lower bar of tolerance to neighbouring schools, but I suspect not.

“I believe a school is a place where, within reason, pupils can make mistakes and learn from them.”

The main reason given for the exclusions from The Kimberley School was ‘other’ but the school also saw 100 incidents of pupils being excluded for physical assault against another pupil, and 64 cases of verbal abuse or threatening behaviour against an adult.

Selston High School had the second highest number of exclusions since 2009 with 443 cases recorded and they also quoted ‘Other’ as the main reason, while persistent disruptive behaviour was the main reason for exclusion from Hall Park Academy with a total of 393 incidents.

However, the Eastwood school recorded the highest number of permanent exclusions in 2012/13 with 0.57 per cent of the pupil population expelled.

John Slater, Service Director for Education at Nottinghamshire County Council, said because all three of the schools are academies, they are not under county council control and so each of them will make up their own rules, decisions and policies around discipline.

He added: “It is important to recognise that the label ‘fixed term exclusion’ covers a multitude of things - from being asked not to attend a particular lesson, to a requirement not to enter school premises for a prescribed number of days (in the majority of cases from one to five days).

“Interpreting fixed term data can consequently be unhelpful and misleading because it does not always describe the same type of punitive measure.”