COLUMN: Huddersfield Town deserve plaudits for their cheap ticket policy - other clubs must now follow it

Empty seats at Huddersfield may soon be a thing of the past. Date:12th December 2015. Picture James Hardisty. Huddersfield Town v Bristol City. Pictured Bristol City's Jonathan Kodjia, (left) turns and celebrates after scoring the opening goal of the match past Huddersfield Keeper Jed Steer.

Empty seats at Huddersfield may soon be a thing of the past. Date:12th December 2015. Picture James Hardisty. Huddersfield Town v Bristol City. Pictured Bristol City's Jonathan Kodjia, (left) turns and celebrates after scoring the opening goal of the match past Huddersfield Keeper Jed Steer.

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Huddersfield Town certainly deserve a pat on the back.

It’s not often you can credit a football club - certainly not when it comes to pricing.

These days clubs invariably can charge what they see fit for season cards, matchday tickets, official merchandise and everything else associated with the club’s ‘brand’.

But you have to applaud the Terriers’ nous when it comes to their decision to unveil season cards priced at £179 for adults.

This equates to just under £8 for each of the 23 league games.

In this day and age, that is an absolute bargain.

Especially when you consider some of Town’s Championship rivals charging upwards of £30 for just one ticket.

The policy implemented by Dean Hoyle, the Terriers’ chairman, is one that alot of other clubs could take heed of.

Why charge over-the-odds for tickets when you can ensure a strong nucleus of fans are on board for throughout the season with initiatives like this?

Surely it’s better to have 10,000 paid-up fans in the stadium than to have a ground of half that figure?

Football clubs need to realise - especially in the Football League - that supporters are no longer going to sit back and take this financial hit easily.

Recent protests, including a mass walkout by Liverpool fans, highlight this point.

Fair enough most clubs will put on two or three schemes throughout the campaign to try and get fans through the turnstiles.

But these only paper over the cracks.

The ‘Twenty’s Plenty’ scheme, launched by the Football Supporter’s Federation over three years ago, have been protesting for a cap on away ticket prices and have earned tangible results with clubs such as Barnsley and Doncaster Rovers reducing costs for away supporters.

£20 seems like a fair price to see most football matches in my opinion.

Obviously there are exceptions such as the latter stages of cup competitions or play-offs etc.

But on the whole £20 for 90 minutes entertainment is a very good deal.

Paying the extortionate prices of top flight clubs, where supporters can part with as much as £70 of their hard-earned cash, is certainly something I would be unwilling to do.

Huddersfield have set a precedent for cheaper tickets to loyal fans - and it’s one that their fellow clubs should consider replicating.