The side of the war not on TV

Burden Of The Desert by Justin Huggler, published in paperback by CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, priced �12.99 (ebook �2.99). Available (PA Photo/CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform)
Burden Of The Desert by Justin Huggler, published in paperback by CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, priced �12.99 (ebook �2.99). Available (PA Photo/CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform)

If you’re planning to get in a spot of reading over Easter, here are few suggestions.

Burden Of The Desert by Justin Huggler, published in paperback by CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, priced £12.99 (ebook £2.99). Available now. Review by Gill Oliver.

The Iraq war churns up a lot of emotions for people, including their opinions on whether it was justified in the first place.

For some, this is mixed with fear for loved ones on acts of duty. But for the vast majority, it is something witnessed only on the TV screen.

However, Justin Huggler manages to make you feel as if you are there, among the dirt and chaos.

Books told from various perspectives can sometimes be confusing, but Huggler’s characters have a clear persona.

This book epitomises the side of war not visible on our TV screens.

Servants: A Downstairs View Of Twentieth-Century Britain by Lucy Lethbridge, published in hardback by Bloomsbury, priced £20 (ebook £10.64). Available now. By Elaine Adu-Poku

Writer, journalist and 
historian Lucy Lethbridge has written a number of non-fiction books for children.

With Servants, her 
latest historical dissection, she draws us into the world downstairs.

From footmen and butlers, maids and housekeepers to au pairs, cleaners and babysitters, the unheard masses and their well-heard masters have been a staple component of British culture.

Comprehensively 
researched and charmingly engaging, it is a sensitive, 
humane and penetrating insight into British society.

The Lost Boy by Camilla Lackberg, is published in hardback by HarperCollins, priced £12.99 (ebook £7.99). Available now. By Victoria Burt.

Scandinavian crime thrillers have been dominating the best-seller charts in this country for a while now but if you haven’t read Camilla Lackberg, you are missing a treat.

Her 12 novels, which include The Stonecutter and The Ice Princess, are all set in her home town of Fjallbacka and feature police officer Patrik Hedstrom and his 
novelist wife Erica. The Lost Boy finds Patrik and his team investigating the murder of local accountant Matts, but the more they dig into his personal life, the more strangely hidden it seems.

Against the backdrop of the cold, beautiful Swedish landscape, they discover his a former girlfriend returned to the area shortly before his death, while other inquiries lead them to a women’s refuge.

As Patrik battles to find the truth, we are drawn into the complications of his home life, where Erica is dealing with the chaos of caring for new-born twins and bereavement.

An intelligently written novel, this is packed with deftly drawn and believable characters who are allowed real-life foibles.

Meanwhile, Lackberg steers us calmly through more grisly discoveries until we reach the chilling conclusion.