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Derbyshire police respond to terror alert

The candlelit memorial at Place de la Rpublique, Paris. (PA Wire.)
The candlelit memorial at Place de la Rpublique, Paris. (PA Wire.)

Derbyshire police is liaising with intelligence services and monitoring local 'tensions' following the brutal attack in Paris on Friday, November 13.

Amid claims that police presence in major cities and transport links has been increased, local forces have issued statements reassuring that they are doing everything they can to keep the public safe.

Assistant Chief Constable Martyn Bates said: “The UK threat level hasn’t changed but that does not mean we are not monitoring events, liaising with intelligence services and checking tensions locally.

“We always assess the police presence at any event where large crowds gather and we will continue to do so.

“We will look to learn any lessons from the Paris attacks and are asking members of the public to go about their daily lives but remain vigilant and report any concerns to us.

“This is the time for communities to come together and support each other.”

Chesterfield FC players ad fans observed a minute's silence for the victims of the attack being a game on Saturday

Chesterfield FC players ad fans observed a minute's silence for the victims of the attack being a game on Saturday

The news follows a statement by the Metropolitan Police, which leads Counter-terrorism activities in the UK, stating that security has been up-scaled nationally.

The force said: "Additional high-visibility patrols are in place to provide reassurance at key locations across the Capital. Officers are working closely with London’s communities and businesses to offer reassurance and advice following the horrific attack in Paris.

The National Police Chiefs' Council lead for counter terrorism, Mark Rowley, said: “The ambition of terrorists is to sow discord, sow distrust and create fear. But at the heart of success in countering terrorism, regardless of the operations we run and the arrests we make, is the relationship between the public and the police. It needs to be stronger than ever.

“In particular, we as the police depend massively on information from communities; whether it’s about suspicious individuals or suspicious behaviours. We’ve had more reports than ever before over the last year. That needs to continue.

A message in the Chesterfield Book of Condolence

A message in the Chesterfield Book of Condolence

“We are reviewing our police stance across the country, but however strong we are, however ready we are, regardless of how many people we are arresting; we will be dependent upon the confidence and strength of communities to work with us.”

Speaking about changes to policing, he added: “We have been strengthening our policing at ports and we have been strengthening policing on the street. People may notice some changes at events at big cities across the country."

Within the same few days as the attack and since 127 people were confirmed killed in Paris on Friday night, news also spread that ISIS are responsible for other attacks around the world, including Beirut and Baghdad, and national headlines quickly claimed the UK was the next target.

Meanwhile local people have been honouring the victims with French flags on social media, and many attended Chesterfield Borough Council today to sign a book of condolence as their offices observed a minute's silence at 11am.

Police upped patrols in Paris after the attack

Police upped patrols in Paris after the attack

Chesterfield FC also held a minute's silence to remember the victims yesterday before playing on Saturday.

A spokesperson said: "It was respected by both sets of fans, and we were grateful to them for observing that. It was also poignant that fans applauded at 22 minutes to honour former player, Marton Fulop who died last week, aged 32. We remembered him as well, so it was a day full of remembrance for us."