Notts County Council look to close ‘legal loophole’ on wild animal hunting

Nottinghamshire County Council. Photo: Joseph Raynor
Nottinghamshire County Council. Photo: Joseph Raynor

Councillors on Nottinghamshire County Council have taken the first steps to ‘closing a legal loophole’ on the hunting of wild animals across Nottinghamshire.

At Nottinghamshire’s Full Council meeting on March 28, Labour’s Councillor Kevin Greaves proposed a motion, advocating for a complete ban on “trail hunting, exempt hunting, and exercising packs of fox hounds” on county council owned land.

The motion was passed through council despite opposition from the Conservative administration and means action will be taken to stop people flouting the Hunting Act 2004.

Councillor Nicki Brooks is an anti-fur campaigner and said she was “delighted” with the outcome.

Speaking after the meeting, she said: “By supporting the motion this Council is simply closing the loophole that allows both the ‘accidental’ and deliberate illegal hunting and killing of animals, as well as a ‘false alibi’ regularly used by hunts to avoid prosecution, from taking place on Council owned land. I’m thrilled that we’ve managed to secure this result here in Nottinghamshire”.

The decision was also welcomed by Chris Luffingham, director of campaigns at the League Against Cruel Sports

He said: “This is a significant decision both for the county of Nottinghamshire and the country as a whole.

“We welcome a ban that not only recognises that animals are still being killed by hunts, but that the excuse of ‘trail’ hunting is nothing more than a lie.

“The League has received 282 reports of illegal hunting in the current hunting season, including 39 reported fox kills.

“We welcome Nottinghamshire County Council’s trail-blazing decision, and we would encourage other counties across the land to follow suit.”

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