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Notts police praised for positive work with victims of hate crime - but the force said it has more to do

Their inspection identified that the forces use of comprehensive risk assessments for victims of hate crime and the policy to offer every victim of hate crime a visit by a warranted police officer or civilian investigative officer as good practice.
Their inspection identified that the forces use of comprehensive risk assessments for victims of hate crime and the policy to offer every victim of hate crime a visit by a warranted police officer or civilian investigative officer as good practice.

Nottinghamshire Police have been praised for its work dealing with hate crime today (Thursday, June 19) in a national inspection report.

The report, by Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire & Rescue Services (HMICFRS) revealed its findings after a hate crime thematic inspection of six forces this year.

Their inspection identified that the force’s use of comprehensive risk assessments for victims of hate crime and the policy to offer every victim of hate crime a visit by a warranted police officer or civilian investigative officer as good practice.

DCC Rachel Barber said: “We are pleased that HMICFRS has recognised the efforts that we have made in tackling hate crime and encouraging victims to have the confidence to report offences.

“We have implemented processes in our control room and introduced an enhanced risk assessment to assess the current harm, risk of harm through repeat victimisation, community cohesion and confidence in Nottinghamshire Police.

“Officers then use their professional judgement to provide an assessment of the level of risk, which has a supervisory review and a final risk assessment of overall risk endorsed. This then affects the additional action we, along with our partners, take to support the individual beyond the investigation.

“Hate crime can have a significant impact on victims, and we continue to listen to our communities and review our approach, in line with their feedback. We also continue to carry out victim satisfaction surveys with victims of hate crime to evaluate the service they receive and pick up any learning that can continue to improve how we operate.”

Paddy Tipping, Nottinghamshire’s Police and Crime Commissioner, said: “I’m delighted that the work we’ve done with partners, in particular Nottingham Citizens, has been recognised. We are not complacent, we know there is more to do, but this is really positive news.”